The Hergé Museum is much more than your average museum: visitors travel deep within the life and work, the trials, tribulations, and astounding creativity of one man, and in doing so traverse the era in which he lived.

Musée Hergé: entry © Nicolas Borel – Atelier Christian de Portzamparc
miniature Musée Hergé: entry - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: side view at night - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: side view, twilight - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: side view, dusk - closeup - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: Closeup of glass cage - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: interior view : column checkered - Click to enlarge
miniature Musée Hergé: interior view from the first floor - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: nterior view, detail - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: interior view, under the staircase - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: interior view, detail - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: interior view, the staircase - Click to enlarge miniature Musée Hergé: detail of a work - Click to enlarge

A beautiful treasure chest

From the outset, I always wanted the architecture of the Museum to be modern, simply because Hergé really liked modern art, be it painting, sculpture, furniture or architecture. Most of all I wanted this to be a place that would display the work of Hergé in its totality. Of course Tintin is the most well known, famous, celebrated and loved side of his work, but it shouldn’t be forgotten that Hergé was much more than Tintin. Speaking for myself, as a little girl and then a teenager, I obviously didn’t know Hergé’s work outside of Tintin’s adventures.

It was only later that I discovered that, while these books, translated into dozens of languages for hundreds of millions of readers, were evidently Hergé’s masterpieces, they still didn’t eclipse the other drawings, magnificent sketches, posters and caricatures of this first-rate artist.

Fanny Rodwell
President of Studios Hergé